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EASY LITTLE SKULLS

SEWING NEEDLES ARE SHARP! ALL KIDS UNDER 10 YEARS MUST BE SUPERVISED BY AN ADULT WHEN WORKING ON THIS

PROJECT.

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PROJECT CHECKLIST

  • Little Skull pattern (free PDF below)

  • ​white felt

  • black felt

  • scissors

  • sewing needle

  • black thread

  • white thread

  • string (optional, to hang ornament)

  • batting for stuffing

  • hot glue (optional)

FREE PDF PatterN

Sewing Level:  EASY

     This is a great project for a beginner. My daughter (she's 8) and I had a fun time together as we stitched up these cute little skulls (mine on the left, hers on the right).  I made this project simple enough for her to enjoy without getting too frustrated and it encourages her to practice basic loop and blanket stitches with the end reward of completing a super cool ornament that she can be proud of.  Little skulls and ghouls aren't meant to be flawless so no matter how the stitches turn out, you'll always have a delightfully spooky ornament that will look perfect on any Halloween tree. 

LET'S GET SEWING

Print out the PDF file of the pattern provided and cut out the pattern pieces.  Use these pattern pieces to cut out the the ornament pieces from felt: head (2 pieces in white), eyes (2 pieces in black) and nose (1 piece in black).  For bigger pieces like the head, it helps to secure the pattern to the felt with pins. In the photo shown (left) my daughter was able to cut out the circle shaped head pieces on her own but needed my help to cut out the smaller pieces.  Definitely give little hands some help with cutting out the felt pieces if needed.   

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Sew on the eyes and nose to the head using blanket stitches.  If little hands find it easier to use simple running stitches to sew on the eyes and nose, go for it! 

TIP:  I used a small dot of hot glue in the centre of each black piece to hold them in place.  This ensures that all my pieces are stuck where I want them and they won't move during stitching. 

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I am not good at stitching freehand so I find it super useful to add in dots with a marker or ink pen to help guide my needle when I'm stitching.  I used loop stitches for the mouth and plain long stitches for the threads that cross the lips.  

LOOP STITCHES UP-CLOSE

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To start the loop stitch, insert the needle at the point where the thread comes out of the felt.

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After inserting the needle, draw it back up to the surface.  The farther away you draw the needle back up from the point where you inserted it, the longer your loop stitch will be.  

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Pull the needle up and draw the thread out, making sure that the thread coming out of the felt is inside the loop.  

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If you've made sure that your thread is inside your loop, you'll have a perfect loop stitch! Repeat the stitch by inserting your needle at the point where the thread comes out, bring your needle back up and pull.

Fix the ornament string to the back felt piece by stitching or by using hot glue.  Place the front head piece on top and use blanket stitches to assemble. It's best to start stitching from the bottom of the head so that it can be stuffed from the bottom.  I find this easier since blanket stitching your project closed from the top can be a big pain when the string is in your way.

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BLANKET STITCHES UP-CLOSE

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To start the blanket stitch, insert the needle downwards through both layers of felt. Pull the needle out to sew the thread through the felt. 

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Make sure your thread comes out through the loop.

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If you've made sure that your thread has come out through the loop, you'll end up with a blanket stitch!

Stop stitching roughly 4cm from the starting point to leave an opening for the batting.  Stuff until you're happy with the puffiness of your project and continue your blanket stitches to close.  

TIP: It's best to start stitching from the bottom so that your little skull can be stuffed from the bottom.  I find this easier because it allows you to blanket stitch your project closed at the bottom instead of at the top where the string is. It can be a big pain to stitch your project closed when the string is in your way.